Qlik Sense and general port troubleshooting on Windows Server 2012 R2

One of the beauties of Qlik Sense Enterprise is that it can be installed on nearly any Windows machine, with very few pre-requisites.

One of the drawbacks is that you may then be tempted to load it onto a multi-purpose box, or at the very least, one with a number of core Windows roles installed (especially if you’re just testing).

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This post is going to offer some quick ways of resolving port clashes, and working out what’s binding where without changing the core Qlik Sense Enterprise installation.

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Changing the RDP Port on Windows 10

By default, remote desktop connections on windows use port 3389. If you find the need to change this port, the following should help. Make sure you have “Allow remote connections to this computer” checked under “System Properties > Remote” before you begin.

In my experience, you should avoid changing the mapped port for core Windows services if possible, as this can cause numerous configuration and management issues. Other options include:
– Using port mapping (forwarding) on your router (e.g. externalip:10000 -> serverip:3389), however not all routers offer this functionality.
– Installing a third party remote desktop app, like Chrome Remote Desktop or LogMeIn, however these require specific software and/or subscriptions
– Deploying a server/PC as a RDP “gateway”. You then access all further RDP hosts from this first point of contact.
– Using a RD gateway/RD Web access. This requires a server with the appropriate role installed, but can optionally be configured with two-factor authorisation like Duo.

To check what port your RDP is currently listening on, use the netstat command in an elevated command prompt.

netstat -abo

This will show information about current network connections and listening ports, as well as associated executables and processes. You’ll see port 3389 bound to “svchost.exe” on “TermService”.

 

To change the bound port you’ll need to open an elevated command prompt and run regedit.

regedit

Navigate to the PortNumber setting.

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE > SYSTEM > CurrentControlSet > Control > Terminal Server > WinStations > RDP-Tcp

Right click on the “REG_DWORD” named “PortNumber” and hit “Modify”. Change the base to Decimal and enter the new port (between 1025 and 65535). You can use NetStat to check if a particular port is already bound to a process.

Once you’ve changed the value, exit RegEdit and either reboot the computer, or simply restart the Remote Desktop Services service using the “Services” snap-in in “Computer Management”. You can confirm the port has been changed by running netstat again (in my case, to 10000).

RDP on port 10000

Finally, open up Windows Firewall and add a new inbound rule for the new port. You won’t be able to change the existing rule as that’s a core system rule, but copy across the values into a new rule and you’ll be good to go.

SEATT updated to 1.3.0

I’ve updated Simple Event Attendance (SEATT WordPress plugin) to version 1.3.0. This brings bug fixes, and updates in line with the release of WordPress 4.3.1.

Firstly, an apology for taking so long to release another version – feel welcome to get in touch if you want to discuss changes you’ve made to your code in the interim. These are largely security changes, so it’s recommended that you update when you can. The database structure hasn’t changed, so you should experience no loss of data.

Changes:

  • Ensured the database elements all use the correct version of wpdb->prepare where needed, and tidied up any inconsistent usage where statements weren’t prepared. Thanks to J.D. Grimes for chasing me on this.
  • Made some text and layout changes throughout to work better with the WordPress default templates.

In the pipeline are a few more changes that should further improve functionality of the plugin:

  • Some sort of functionality to allow repeatable events – whether this be decoupling of event details from dates, or some other mechanism.
  • Selectable categories for lists, allowing you to put one shortcode into a post/page and get a list of all active events.
  • Anonymous registration – something that quite a few have asked for. It will be turned off by default but it is coming with captcha user verification.
  • Email notification – I haven’t explored this yet, but am hoping it can be done using internal wordpress functions.

Live at https://wordpress.org/plugins/simple-event-attendance/

As always, any feedback is very welcome.