Setting up a CentOS 7 local development VM with LAMP (Linux, Apache, MariaDB/MySQL, PHP+PHPMyAdmin)

I’m going to build a local VM with the following requirements:
1) It can host PHP/SQL-based websites
2) It has PHPMyAdmin to help administer any SQL databases
3) It matches available builds from popular providers (i.e. you can provision it in a similar way on Azure or AWS, but with a public domain name)
4) It only has a single account (this is not recommended for public systems)
5) I can access the web root using SFTP

As I already have several CentOS builds that have always been pre-setup with CPanel (and because CentOS is free), I’ve decided to do this build from scratch and without a control panel. I’m not going to be configuring options like multiple user accounts, so things will be fairly simple.

I’ll do it in steps (and test each time) to make sure everything’s working correctly. You could install everything all at once, but that would make it much harder to troubleshoot if an element didn’t work.

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Changing the RDP Port on Windows 10

By default, remote desktop connections on windows use port 3389. If you find the need to change this port, the following should help. Make sure you have “Allow remote connections to this computer” checked under “System Properties > Remote” before you begin.

In my experience, you should avoid changing the mapped port for core Windows services if possible, as this can cause numerous configuration and management issues. Other options include:
– Using port mapping (forwarding) on your router (e.g. externalip:10000 -> serverip:3389), however not all routers offer this functionality.
– Installing a third party remote desktop app, like Chrome Remote Desktop or LogMeIn, however these require specific software and/or subscriptions
– Deploying a server/PC as a RDP “gateway”. You then access all further RDP hosts from this first point of contact.
– Using a RD gateway/RD Web access. This requires a server with the appropriate role installed, but can optionally be configured with two-factor authorisation like Duo.

To check what port your RDP is currently listening on, use the netstat command in an elevated command prompt.

netstat -abo

This will show information about current network connections and listening ports, as well as associated executables and processes. You’ll see port 3389 bound to “svchost.exe” on “TermService”.

 

To change the bound port you’ll need to open an elevated command prompt and run regedit.

regedit

Navigate to the PortNumber setting.

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE > SYSTEM > CurrentControlSet > Control > Terminal Server > WinStations > RDP-Tcp

Right click on the “REG_DWORD” named “PortNumber” and hit “Modify”. Change the base to Decimal and enter the new port (between 1025 and 65535). You can use NetStat to check if a particular port is already bound to a process.

Once you’ve changed the value, exit RegEdit and either reboot the computer, or simply restart the Remote Desktop Services service using the “Services” snap-in in “Computer Management”. You can confirm the port has been changed by running netstat again (in my case, to 10000).

RDP on port 10000

Finally, open up Windows Firewall and add a new inbound rule for the new port. You won’t be able to change the existing rule as that’s a core system rule, but copy across the values into a new rule and you’ll be good to go.